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Ø  it is a preventable cancer.

Ø  a known etiology, a hpv ( human papilloma virus)

Ø  a known mode of spread i.e sexually transmitted

Ø  a very good and inexpensive screening test called pap smear which identifies it several years ahead at a precancerous stage making it amenable to prevention and early treatment with good prognosis.

Ø  an effective vaccine

Ø  unlike other stis (sexually transmitted infections) it is not fully protected by condoms.

we live in an era of sexual liberalisation with far reaching consequences. stis are a rising concern, with long term consequences. hiv is just the tip of iceberg.

the high risk factors are those with

-        multiple sex partners

-        early initiation of sexual activity

-        poor knowledge of contraception

-        hesitation in using barrier method by male partners

-        low socio-economic status with poor access to health care services, including pap tests

-        prostitutes, prison inmates,  drug addicts, those attending sti clinics

-        smoking, low immunity status like hiv, use of birth control pills for > 5 years, being younger than 17 at the time of first delivery, multiparity i.e having 3 or more children.

even the first wife dying of a cervical cancer placed the second wife at high risk.

yet despite the familiarity with the disease, it continues to flourish especially in developing countries. most of those who suffered rarely made to the hospital in time. educated women, even doctors hardly turned up for their pap smear in time. may be it was a feminine trait, being indifferent to their own health.

an effective vaccine lay underutilised because of unawareness and sometimes non affordability.

a  report published by the centers for disease control and prevention (cdc) tells,

       young people aged 15-24 years develop half of all new sexually transmitted infections (stis),

       1 in 4 sexually active adolescent females has an sti

no wonder the lower limit of giving hpv vaccine, that acts best when given before the sexual debut has been brought down to 9 years of age; a definite sign of society’s paradigm

“this epidemic is one result of a sexually saturated culture and the myth perpetuated by academe, medicine and pharmaceutical companies that latex, contraception and  vaccines can make all sexual behavior risk free.” 

even among prime-time network television shows, there is only 1 portrayal of protective behavior or comment regarding stis for every 25 instances of sexual behavior shown.

sadly one-quarter of adolescents and young adults in high-risk age groups for stis did not have health care coverage.

only 11 percent of teenagers surveyed reported getting most of their information regarding stis from their parents or other family members.

knowledge and awareness of stis among the public is poor; almost two-thirds of women,18-60 years of age surveyed knew nothing or very little about stis other than aids.

young women and female adolescents are more susceptible to stis compared to their male counterparts because of their biological characteristics. during puberty and young adulthood, specific cells (columnar epithelium) are especially sensitive to invasion by certain sexually transmitted organisms are more exposed.

women and female adolescents may also find it more difficult than men to implement protective behaviors, partly because of the power imbalance between men and women

the only way to curb the rising epidemic was by :

  • inculcating responsible behaviour

sounds like a cliché but if you don’t take a detailed sexual history of your partner on your date, you don’t know him well enough to have sex.

and ‘safe sex’ is sex with your faithful spouse!  

  • encourage use of contraception ( barrier method )

§  enforcing pap smear in sexually active women ( 21-65 years) at least every 3 year( even in those previously vaccinated with hpv vaccine), or combining it with hpv testing every 5 years ( >30 years of age).

“screen-and-treat” and “screen, diagnose and treat” are both valuable approaches

 

  • promoting cervical cancer vaccine; may be a government initiative making the vaccine cost effective, mandatory or even free to all adolescent girls.
  • health education
  • tracing contact/ partner & treatment  for stis , wherever possiblecancer cervix is the leading cancer in indian women and the second most common worldwide. the precancerous changes start early, usually in the twenties, once the women is sexually active and if undetected and untreated  may turn into a full blown cancer by the time the woman is in her 50s.

    ironically, there are several good things about this cancer.

    Ø  it is a preventable cancer.

    Ø  a known etiology, a hpv ( human papilloma virus)

    Ø  a known mode of spread i.e sexually transmitted

    Ø  a very good and inexpensive screening test called pap smear which identifies it several years ahead at a precancerous stage making it amenable to prevention and early treatment with good prognosis.

    Ø  an effective vaccine

    Ø  unlike other stis (sexually transmitted infections) it is not fully protected by condoms.

    we live in an era of sexual liberalisation with far reaching consequences. stis are a rising concern, with long term consequences. hiv is just the tip of iceberg.

    the high risk factors are those with

    -        multiple sex partners

    -        early initiation of sexual activity

    -        poor knowledge of contraception

    -        hesitation in using barrier method by male partners

    -        low socio-economic status with poor access to health care services, including pap tests

    -        prostitutes, prison inmates,  drug addicts, those attending sti clinics

    -        smoking, low immunity status like hiv, use of birth control pills for > 5 years, being younger than 17 at the time of first delivery, multiparity i.e having 3 or more children.

    even the first wife dying of a cervical cancer placed the second wife at high risk.

    yet despite the familiarity with the disease, it continues to flourish especially in developing countries. most of those who suffered rarely made to the hospital in time. educated women, even doctors hardly turned up for their pap smear in time. may be it was a feminine trait, being indifferent to their own health.

    an effective vaccine lay underutilised because of unawareness and sometimes non affordability.

    a  report published by the centers for disease control and prevention (cdc) tells,

           young people aged 15-24 years develop half of all new sexually transmitted infections (stis),

           1 in 4 sexually active adolescent females has an sti

    no wonder the lower limit of giving hpv vaccine, that acts best when given before the sexual debut has been brought down to 9 years of age; a definite sign of society’s paradigm

    “this epidemic is one result of a sexually saturated culture and the myth perpetuated by academe, medicine and pharmaceutical companies that latex, contraception and  vaccines can make all sexual behavior risk free.” 

    even among prime-time network television shows, there is only 1 portrayal of protective behavior or comment regarding stis for every 25 instances of sexual behavior shown.

    sadly one-quarter of adolescents and young adults in high-risk age groups for stis did not have health care coverage.

    only 11 percent of teenagers surveyed reported getting most of their information regarding stis from their parents or other family members.

    knowledge and awareness of stis among the public is poor; almost two-thirds of women,18-60 years of age surveyed knew nothing or very little about stis other than aids.

    young women and female adolescents are more susceptible to stis compared to their male counterparts because of their biological characteristics. during puberty and young adulthood, specific cells (columnar epithelium) are especially sensitive to invasion by certain sexually transmitted organisms are more exposed.

    women and female adolescents may also find it more difficult than men to implement protective behaviors, partly because of the power imbalance between men and women

    the only way to curb the rising epidemic was by :

    • inculcating responsible behaviour

    sounds like a cliché but if you don’t take a detailed sexual history of your partner on your date, you don’t know him well enough to have sex.

    and ‘safe sex’ is sex with your faithful spouse!  

    • encourage use of contraception ( barrier method )

    §  enforcing pap smear in sexually active women ( 21-65 years) at least every 3 year( even in those previously vaccinated with hpv vaccine), or combining it with hpv testing every 5 years ( >30 years of age).

    “screen-and-treat” and “screen, diagnose and treat” are both valuable approaches

     

    • promoting cervical cancer vaccine; may be a government initiative making the vaccine cost effective, mandatory or even free to all adolescent girls.
    • health education
    • tracing contact/ partner & treatment  for stis , wherever possible
  • public begging for blood donation

  • Gall stone disease and public awareness
  •   Dr. Amit Sachdeva , Dentist
  •   Dr. Dhiren Kumar , ENT (EAR-NOSE-THROAT)
  •   Dr. Shraddha Sahu , Nutritionist Dietician
  •   Dr. Dr mahima Kak Nagpaul , Gynecologist Obstetrician
  •   Dr. Nikhil Gupta , Psychiatrist
  •   Ayushi Hospital, Allahabad
  •   Malia Hospital & Research Centre, Bahraich
  •   Kantilal Gandhi Memorial Hospital, Jamshedpur
  •   Bhandari Hospital & Research Centre, Jaipur
  •   Patna Ivf & Endosurgery Centre, Patna
  • -->

    Mindfully eating can help reducing over eating

    Mindfully eating can help reducing over eating

    overeating

    Is healthy eating one of your resolutions for the upcoming new year? Try these tips to curb overeating by being more mindful.


    Often a new year brings resolutions to get healthy, eat better and lose weight. As most of us know, this is much easier said than done. It becomes more difficult when we have issues with challenging work schedules, numerous child care responsibilities and that office candy bowl that is so tempting.  Mindless eating can sabotage our resolve, so what can we do about it?


    “Most of us don’t overeat because we’re hungry,” said Brian Wansink, Ph.D., author of the best-selling book Mindless Eating: Why We Eat More Than We Think and the John Dyson Professor of Consumer Behavior at Cornell University. “We overeat because of family and friends, packages and plates, names and numbers, labels and lights, colors and candles, shapes and smells, distractions and distances, cupboards and containers.”


    He attributes rising overweight and obesity rates in America to the availability of food, the affordability of food and the attractiveness of food.  The solution, however, is not to make food less available, affordable or attractive, he says. “The solution is to change your personal environment,” Wansink said.


    Mindless eating is defined as deliberately paying attention, being fully aware of what is happening both inside and outside yourself – in your body, heart and mind – and outside yourself, in your environment.


    Wansink made the following suggestions for changing our thought process and our environment to improve our resolution success and create better long-term eating patterns:


    Smaller plates. Using a 9.5 inch plate vs. 12 inch plate means smaller portions and feeling fuller after eating an entire plate of food. Studies have shown food consumption is 22 percent lower when eating from a smaller plate.

    Smaller serving utensils. “Mini-sizing” utensils can reduce the amount of food consumed.

    Out of sight, out of mind. Leaving serving bowls and entrees away from the dinner table can prevent second and third servings.

    Easy access. Making healthy foods more accessible in cabinets, cupboards and even the refrigerator encourages healthy choices.                                                                                                        

    Control portions. Wansink found that people eat much more food when given unlimited quantities. He advises people to eat smaller portion sizes in smaller packages.

    Eat when you’re hungry. Let actual hunger cues, not emotions, guide your eating. Substitute a quick walk for a snack until actual hunger sets in. But don’t wait until you’re famished and binge on unhealthy foods.

    Plan. Prepare healthy snacks ahead of time to eat throughout the day. A 200-calorie, whole grain, high-fiber snack can satisfy hunger between meals. Fiber keeps you feeling full longer.

    Keep a food diary. Write down everything you eat and what was happening at the time to identify food triggers – hunger, stress, excitement or boredom. Be careful not to obsess over every calorie. The new American Heart Association diet and lifestyle guidelines acknowledge that overall eating patterns, not occasional indulgences, are what are most important to maintaining a healthy weight and lifestyle.

    Slow down. Here’s where mindfulness can really come into play. During each meal, chew slowly, savoring each bite; put your fork down between bites; and stop eating to take a drink of water (not a sugary soda). This gives the body enough time to signal to the brain that it’s satisfied, not stuffed.

    Pay attention. Don’t eat in front of the TV or computer, while standing at the kitchen counter or talking on the phone. This can lead to losing track of how much you’ve consumed.

    Use technology. “We can actually use our smartphones and other electronic devices to help us,” said Riska Platt, M.S., a registered dietitian and certified nutritionist for the Cardiac Rehabilitation Center at Mt. Sinai Medical Center in New York and a volunteer with the American Heart Association. “There are now apps that manage food records, count calories, help you track what you eat and even provide guidance on healthy food choices at the grocery store and restaurants.”

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