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Ø  it is a preventable cancer.

Ø  a known etiology, a hpv ( human papilloma virus)

Ø  a known mode of spread i.e sexually transmitted

Ø  a very good and inexpensive screening test called pap smear which identifies it several years ahead at a precancerous stage making it amenable to prevention and early treatment with good prognosis.

Ø  an effective vaccine

Ø  unlike other stis (sexually transmitted infections) it is not fully protected by condoms.

we live in an era of sexual liberalisation with far reaching consequences. stis are a rising concern, with long term consequences. hiv is just the tip of iceberg.

the high risk factors are those with

-        multiple sex partners

-        early initiation of sexual activity

-        poor knowledge of contraception

-        hesitation in using barrier method by male partners

-        low socio-economic status with poor access to health care services, including pap tests

-        prostitutes, prison inmates,  drug addicts, those attending sti clinics

-        smoking, low immunity status like hiv, use of birth control pills for > 5 years, being younger than 17 at the time of first delivery, multiparity i.e having 3 or more children.

even the first wife dying of a cervical cancer placed the second wife at high risk.

yet despite the familiarity with the disease, it continues to flourish especially in developing countries. most of those who suffered rarely made to the hospital in time. educated women, even doctors hardly turned up for their pap smear in time. may be it was a feminine trait, being indifferent to their own health.

an effective vaccine lay underutilised because of unawareness and sometimes non affordability.

a  report published by the centers for disease control and prevention (cdc) tells,

       young people aged 15-24 years develop half of all new sexually transmitted infections (stis),

       1 in 4 sexually active adolescent females has an sti

no wonder the lower limit of giving hpv vaccine, that acts best when given before the sexual debut has been brought down to 9 years of age; a definite sign of society’s paradigm

“this epidemic is one result of a sexually saturated culture and the myth perpetuated by academe, medicine and pharmaceutical companies that latex, contraception and  vaccines can make all sexual behavior risk free.” 

even among prime-time network television shows, there is only 1 portrayal of protective behavior or comment regarding stis for every 25 instances of sexual behavior shown.

sadly one-quarter of adolescents and young adults in high-risk age groups for stis did not have health care coverage.

only 11 percent of teenagers surveyed reported getting most of their information regarding stis from their parents or other family members.

knowledge and awareness of stis among the public is poor; almost two-thirds of women,18-60 years of age surveyed knew nothing or very little about stis other than aids.

young women and female adolescents are more susceptible to stis compared to their male counterparts because of their biological characteristics. during puberty and young adulthood, specific cells (columnar epithelium) are especially sensitive to invasion by certain sexually transmitted organisms are more exposed.

women and female adolescents may also find it more difficult than men to implement protective behaviors, partly because of the power imbalance between men and women

the only way to curb the rising epidemic was by :

  • inculcating responsible behaviour

sounds like a cliché but if you don’t take a detailed sexual history of your partner on your date, you don’t know him well enough to have sex.

and ‘safe sex’ is sex with your faithful spouse!  

  • encourage use of contraception ( barrier method )

§  enforcing pap smear in sexually active women ( 21-65 years) at least every 3 year( even in those previously vaccinated with hpv vaccine), or combining it with hpv testing every 5 years ( >30 years of age).

“screen-and-treat” and “screen, diagnose and treat” are both valuable approaches

 

  • promoting cervical cancer vaccine; may be a government initiative making the vaccine cost effective, mandatory or even free to all adolescent girls.
  • health education
  • tracing contact/ partner & treatment  for stis , wherever possiblecancer cervix is the leading cancer in indian women and the second most common worldwide. the precancerous changes start early, usually in the twenties, once the women is sexually active and if undetected and untreated  may turn into a full blown cancer by the time the woman is in her 50s.

    ironically, there are several good things about this cancer.

    Ø  it is a preventable cancer.

    Ø  a known etiology, a hpv ( human papilloma virus)

    Ø  a known mode of spread i.e sexually transmitted

    Ø  a very good and inexpensive screening test called pap smear which identifies it several years ahead at a precancerous stage making it amenable to prevention and early treatment with good prognosis.

    Ø  an effective vaccine

    Ø  unlike other stis (sexually transmitted infections) it is not fully protected by condoms.

    we live in an era of sexual liberalisation with far reaching consequences. stis are a rising concern, with long term consequences. hiv is just the tip of iceberg.

    the high risk factors are those with

    -        multiple sex partners

    -        early initiation of sexual activity

    -        poor knowledge of contraception

    -        hesitation in using barrier method by male partners

    -        low socio-economic status with poor access to health care services, including pap tests

    -        prostitutes, prison inmates,  drug addicts, those attending sti clinics

    -        smoking, low immunity status like hiv, use of birth control pills for > 5 years, being younger than 17 at the time of first delivery, multiparity i.e having 3 or more children.

    even the first wife dying of a cervical cancer placed the second wife at high risk.

    yet despite the familiarity with the disease, it continues to flourish especially in developing countries. most of those who suffered rarely made to the hospital in time. educated women, even doctors hardly turned up for their pap smear in time. may be it was a feminine trait, being indifferent to their own health.

    an effective vaccine lay underutilised because of unawareness and sometimes non affordability.

    a  report published by the centers for disease control and prevention (cdc) tells,

           young people aged 15-24 years develop half of all new sexually transmitted infections (stis),

           1 in 4 sexually active adolescent females has an sti

    no wonder the lower limit of giving hpv vaccine, that acts best when given before the sexual debut has been brought down to 9 years of age; a definite sign of society’s paradigm

    “this epidemic is one result of a sexually saturated culture and the myth perpetuated by academe, medicine and pharmaceutical companies that latex, contraception and  vaccines can make all sexual behavior risk free.” 

    even among prime-time network television shows, there is only 1 portrayal of protective behavior or comment regarding stis for every 25 instances of sexual behavior shown.

    sadly one-quarter of adolescents and young adults in high-risk age groups for stis did not have health care coverage.

    only 11 percent of teenagers surveyed reported getting most of their information regarding stis from their parents or other family members.

    knowledge and awareness of stis among the public is poor; almost two-thirds of women,18-60 years of age surveyed knew nothing or very little about stis other than aids.

    young women and female adolescents are more susceptible to stis compared to their male counterparts because of their biological characteristics. during puberty and young adulthood, specific cells (columnar epithelium) are especially sensitive to invasion by certain sexually transmitted organisms are more exposed.

    women and female adolescents may also find it more difficult than men to implement protective behaviors, partly because of the power imbalance between men and women

    the only way to curb the rising epidemic was by :

    • inculcating responsible behaviour

    sounds like a cliché but if you don’t take a detailed sexual history of your partner on your date, you don’t know him well enough to have sex.

    and ‘safe sex’ is sex with your faithful spouse!  

    • encourage use of contraception ( barrier method )

    §  enforcing pap smear in sexually active women ( 21-65 years) at least every 3 year( even in those previously vaccinated with hpv vaccine), or combining it with hpv testing every 5 years ( >30 years of age).

    “screen-and-treat” and “screen, diagnose and treat” are both valuable approaches

     

    • promoting cervical cancer vaccine; may be a government initiative making the vaccine cost effective, mandatory or even free to all adolescent girls.
    • health education
    • tracing contact/ partner & treatment  for stis , wherever possible
  •   Dr. Sabrina Yesmin , Pediatrician
  •   Dr. S M Palkar , Ayurveda
  •   Dr. Jayanti Chakraborty , Pediatrician
  •   Dr. Shraddha Jethani , Dermatologist
  •   Dr. Neha Arora , Ophthalmologist
  •   Siddhi IVF Fertility Center, Palghar
  •   Anandrishiji Hospital, Ahmednagar
  •   Aashka Multispeciality Hospital, Gandhinagar
  •   Meditrina Hospital, Thiruvananthapuram
  •   Sofat Infertility Centre, Ludhiana
  • -->

    Overview of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome

    Overview of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
    Polycystic ovary syndrome commonly called as PCOS is a condition that results due to hormonal imbalance. PCOS can lead to menstrual problems and make it difficult for the women to conceive. PCOS can also lead to severe complications, if not treated on time. Generally the sex hormones get out of balance in PCOS. The main cause of the PCOS is not clearly understood. Polycystic ovarian syndrome is generally related to genetics as people with family history of PCOS are at higher risks of developing PCOS. Male sex hormones androgens are usually produced in the ovaries. These male sex hormones are produced in large amounts during PCOS which results in stopping ovulation to a greater extent. Due to the excess production of male sex hormone symptoms becomes more visible. The common symptoms include acne, extra facial hair and body hair. During PCOS the body will not be able to utilize insulin that can lead to insulin resistance. Diagnosis of Polycystic ovary syndrome The common diagnostic test your doctor might suggest for polycystic ovarian syndrome includes: Physical examination Physical examination is the initial procedure to diagnose a disease. During physical examination your doctor will make a note of the basic information like height, weight and blood pressure. Pelvic examination During pelvic examination, your doctor will visualize your reproductive organs to examine the signs of masses, its growth and abnormalities. Blood tests Blood tests are done to measure the hormonal levels in your body. Apart from the hormonal levels, additional tests like fasting cholesterol and triglycerides levels are also done. Ultrasound An ultrasound examination is done to get a clear picture of your ovaries and to measure the thickness of the lining of your uterus. PCOS Treatment PCOS treatment depends mainly on the life style you carry. A healthy lifestyle has a positive impact on the polycystic ovary syndrome treatment. The basic life style changes that you can make are: Maintain a healthy weight You need to maintain a healthy normal weight as obesity makes insulin resistance worse. Weight loss helps in reducing both insulin and androgen levels in the body. Losing weight also helps in restoring ovulation. There is no specific diet that can cure polycystic ovary syndrome. The best way to maintain and prevent PCOS is to reduce the number of calories you intake each day. Have a healthy balanced diet The risk of PCOS increases with a low-fat, high carbohydrate diet as it may increase your insulin levels. A low carbohydrate diet is generally preferable for PCOS. Regular physical activities Regular physical activities can help in lowering your blood sugar levels. Daily exercise also prevents insulin resistance and helps you in keeping your weight under control. The PCOS treatments is done at competitive rates and by skilled professionals. PCOD is another term used for PCOS. PCOD treatment at the specialized fertility centers in Hyderabad. The infertility specialist in Hitech city is known to perform the PCOS treatment effectively in a short span of time. The infertility specialist in Dilsukh nagar and Miyapur are famous for the infertility treatments.

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